Leonard Koch

A retired, "Pioneer", Leonard is probably the oldest continuing supporter and participant in the development of the original concept of nuclear power. This concept was conceived by Enrico Fermi and his brilliant colleagues in the late 1940's and provided the basis for the original "scientific concept" for nuclear power: the need to use fast neutrons and to recycle the fuel. From the beginning he was directly involved in establishing the feasibility of meeting those requirements.

He joined Argonne National Laboratory in early 1948 and participated in the development, design, construction and early operation of EBR-l as the Associate Project Engineer.

He was responsible for the development, design and construction of the EBR-ll as the Project Manager. He wrote the book, "EBR-ll", published by the American Nuclear Soceity, which describes that activity.

Leonard received his B.S in M.E. from Illinois Institute of Technology and his MBA from the University of Chicago.

Twenty five years after ending his employment as Vice President of Illinois Power Company he continues to believe that Fast Breeder Reactors with Fuel Recycle are the energy source of the future.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society. He received the Walter H. Zinn Award from the Power Division of the ANS and the Global Energy International Prize from Russia.

 

William Tucker (WSJ FEB. 28, 2010 PAGE A15) is "RIGHT ON" except that he stopped short.
He properly described that the revival of the outdated arguments of the "anti-nucs" has
been refuted, but he omitted the much more important next phase which is now receiving timely International attention.

The world hasn't even begun to use "real nuclear power". A pound of uranium contains
the energy equivalent of 5000 barrels of oil (at $75 a barrel that is equivalent to $375,000 worth of    energy per pound. At the present, time the world is extracting about 1% of it, BUT we know what we must do to extract the rest of it. The discoverers of nuclear power, Enrico Fermi and his colleagues told the world it would be necessary to recycle uranium in a fast neutron reactor
(about 60 years ago). The U.S. listened and responded.